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Sexual Assault Awareness

Report an Incident

The University of Pittsburgh at Bradford values the safety and health of all members of the Pitt-Bradford community and seeks to foster an environment where its students and employees treat other persons with respect, civility, and dignity. Any behavior that involves sexual assault or harassment, relationship violence, or stalking of another person will not be tolerated.

If You Have Experienced Sexual Assault

If you are the victim of sexual assault, dating or domestic violence and/or stalking, know that resources are in place to provide immediate support and assistance, as well as to ensure your health and safety, whether or not you choose to pursue a complaint or report. If you do choose to file a report or complaint, there are several options available.

Remember: sexual assault is never the victim’s fault. Reach out—get help.

What to do:

Get To A Safe Place:

Your immediate safety is the top priority. As quickly as possible, find a safe place away from the attacker or any potential danger.

Contact Campus Police:

Call Campus Police at 814-368-3211 or 10333 from a campus phone immediately if you feel you are in danger or to report stalking, domestic violence, sexual violence of sexual assault. Even if you choose not to formally report an incident or pursue a complaint, Campus Police can help, including transporting you to emergency medical care and evaluation.

Get Emergency Medical Attention:
Receiving expert medical attention as soon as possible will protect your health and can preserve important medical evidence. Preservation of medical evidence (ideally within 72 hours of the assault) keeps your options open, since it may be needed if you choose to pursue a criminal or legal complaint. To preserve evidence, do not shower, douche or change clothes or bedding before you seek emergency attention. If oral contact took place, do not brush teeth, smoke or eat.

24 hours: Bradford Regional Medical Center
Emergency Department: 814-362-8274
Women’s Health Services: 814-362-8480

NOTE: Only hospital emergency rooms can collect physical evidence of sexual assault. While all hospitals are required by law to report to the police any injury that is the result of a crime, this does not obligate you to file formal charges.

Seek Confidential Crisis Counseling:
Crisis counseling can provide you with immediate emotional support and help connect you to key resources and information. There are two 24-hour crisis-response lines available to assist victims of sexual assault/violence:

24-Hour Crisis-Response Lines Business-Hour Crisis Support
Bradford YWCA
Victims’ Resource Center: 814-368-4235
Sexual Assault/Violence Hotline: 888-822-6325
Counseling Services
814-362-5272
226 Frame-Westerberg Commons
The Guidance Center
Crisis Intervention Line: 814-362-4623 or 1-800-459-6568

Consider Your Reporting Options:

There are several options for formally reporting an incident of sexual assault/violence. Survivors of assault can choose one, all or none of these options. University officials will maintain as much confidentiality as possible by law in order to keep you and the campus community safe*. Anonymous reporting of sexual assault is also possible when contacting any of the offices below. Keep in mind that anonymous reporting greatly limits the University’s ability to respond to and investigate an incident.

  • File a criminal complaint with Campus Police at 814-368-3211 or 10333 from a campus phone.
  • If the alleged perpetrator is a Pitt-Bradford student, you can file a complaint for violation of the Student Code of Conduct with the Office of Judicial Affairs at 814-362-7630.
  • Sexual assault is a form of sexual harassment/discrimination. Under Title IX, you may file a complaint if you are a victim of sexual assault, or if you believe you have been retaliated against for complaining of sexual assault or harassment or for providing information in an investigation. Contact: Eddie Buggie, Title IX and Equity Investigator, 814-362-7513 or ebuggie@pitt.edu.

* Different employees on campus have different abilities to maintain confidentiality. For an overview, see the Quick Guide. For complete information, see “Reporting and Confidentially Disclosing Sexual Violence: Know The Options”.

The University of Pittsburgh also offers additional resources you may find helpful.

Content

The University of Pittsburgh at Bradford urges victims of sexual violence to talk to someone and receive the support and care that they need, and to report any incident of sexual violence so that it can be addressed.

The University will strive to maintain confidentiality where lawful. However, you should know that different employees on campus have different abilities to maintain confidentiality. By law, some employees can maintain confidentiality and are not required to report any information about an incident to the Title IX Liaison. However, other “responsible employees” have the duty to report incidents of sexual violence to appropriate University officials, such as the Title IX Liaison. Even these employees, however are permitted to share information on a need-to-know basis or as required by law.

The following information is intended for students who are 18 years and older. Confidentiality rules are more limited for minors.

Campus Resource Confidentiality Level
Counseling Services
814-362-5272
Confidential. Not required to report.
Health Services
814-362-5272
Mostly Confidential. Required to report general statistics but no identifying information to Title IX and Equity Investigator.
Resident Advisors Information shared on a need-to-know basis in the investigation or student conduct process. Matter is kept as private as practicable.
Must report information to the Title IX and Equity Investigator.
Faculty and Staff Information shared on a need-to-know basis in the investigation or student conduct process. Matter is kept as private as practicable.
Must report information to the Title IX and Equity Investigator.
Office of Judicial Affairs
814-362-7630
Information shared on a need-to-know basis in the investigation or student conduct process. Matter is kept as private as practicable.
Must report information to the Title IX and Equity Investigator.
Campus Police
814-368-3211
10333 (from a campus phone)
Information shared on a need-to-know basis in the investigation or student conduct process. Must report to the Title IX and Equity Investigator.
Title IX and Equity Investigator
814-362-7513
Information shared on a need-to-know basis in the investigation or student conduct process. Matter is kept as private as practicable.
Content

The University of Pittsburgh at Bradford values the safety and health of all members of the Pitt-Bradford community and seeks to foster an environment where its students and employees treat other persons with respect, civility, and dignity. Any behavior that involves sexual assault of harassment, relationship violence, or stalking of another person is prohibited.

If substantiated, such behavior may result in criminal charges if reported to the Pitt-Bradford Police Department, and/or University disciplinary action, if the Office of Judicial Affairs or the Title IX Liaison investigates a complaint or referral. The University will use these processes to investigate and resolve reports of sexual assault or harassment, relationship violence, or stalking. In cases involving sexual violence, the University understands that victims oftentimes seek confidentiality and will attempt to honor such a request in most cases. However, the University will weigh such a request for confidentiality against any factors that may have a negative impact on the campus community, such as the use of a weapon or multiple alleged victims.

Accused students or employees should know that the initiation of any University proceedings does not preclude the possibility of criminal charges. Indeed, parallel University and criminal proceedings are not uncommon.

In addition to using these processes, the University will continue to engage in prevention programs and training for students, faculty and staff in an effort to prevent sexual assault and harassment, relationship violence, and stalking. Pitt-Bradford’s office of counseling and the YWCA Victims Resource Center of McKean County provides counseling to victims of sexual assault, assists victims in obtaining medical care and offers support in all aspects of the recovery process.

Included below are key definitions:

Sexual misconduct covers many actions, some of which violate the Code of Conduct and some of which violate the Code and state or federal criminal law. Here are some common definitions:

Sexual Assault is a term that encompasses rape, forcible fondling, incest, and statutory rape. In Pennsylvania, sexual assault also is a separate statute defined as sexual intercourse or deviate sexual intercourse without the complainant’s consent.

Relationship Violence refers to domestic and dating violence, both of which include emotional, verbal and economic abuse in addition to physical abuse.

Stalking means engaging in acts toward another person with the intent to place the person in reasonable fear of bodily injury or cause emotional distress. Stalking is defined as repeatedly following, harassing, threatening or intimidating another individual using such methods including, but not limited to, telephone, mail, electronic communication, and social media.

Consent is an informed, affirmative decision made freely and actively by all parties to engage in mutually acceptable sexual activity. Consent is given by clear words or actions and may not be inferred from silence, passivity, or lack of resistance alone. Existence of a current or previous dating, marital, and/or sexual relationship is not sufficient to constitute consent to additional sexual activity. Consent to one type of sexual activity does not imply consent to other types of sexual activity.

Someone who is unconscious, asleep, or otherwise mentally or physically incapacitated, whether due to alcohol, drugs, or some other condition, cannot give consent. Consent cannot be obtained by force, intimidation, threat, coercion, isolation, or confinement. Agreement obtained under such conditions does not constitute consent. A person’s use of alcohol and/or other drugs does not necessarily eliminate his or her responsibility to obtain consent.

Legal Definitions

Federal Definitions

Dating Violence:

The term “dating violence” means violence committed by a person:

  1. Who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; and
  2. Where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a consideration of the following factors:
  • the length of the relationship
  • the type of relationship the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship

Domestic Violence:

The term “domestic violence” includes felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed by a current or former spouse of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction received grant monies, or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction.

Stalking:

Stalking means engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for his or her safety or the safety of others or suffer substantial emotional distress.

Pennsylvania Definitions

Rape:18 Pa.C.S.A. § 3121

(a) Offense defined.--A person commits a felony of the first degree when the person engages in sexual intercourse with a complainant:

  • By forcible compulsion.
  • By threat of forcible compulsion that would prevent resistance by a person of reasonable resolution.
  • Who is unconscious or where the person knows that the complainant is unaware that the sexual intercourse is occurring.
  • Where the person has substantially impaired the complainant’s power to appraise or control his or her conduct by administering or employing, without the knowledge of the complainant, drugs, intoxicants or other means for the purpose of preventing resistance.
  • Who suffers from a mental disability which renders the complainant incapable of consent.

(b) Additional penalties.--In addition to the penalty provided for by subsection (a), a person may be sentenced to an additional term not to exceed ten years’ confinement and an additional amount not to exceed $100,000 where the person engages in sexual intercourse with a complainant and has substantially impaired the complainant’s power to appraise or control his or her conduct by administering or employing, without the knowledge of the complainant, any substance for the purpose of preventing resistance through the inducement of euphoria, memory loss and any other effect of this substance.

(c) Rape of a child.--A person commits the offense of rape of a child, a felony of the first degree, when the person engages in sexual intercourse with a complainant who is less than 13 years of age.

(d) Rape of a child with serious bodily injury.--A person commits the offense of rape of a child resulting in serious bodily injury, a felony of the first degree, when the person violates this section and the complainant is under 13 years of age and suffers serious bodily injury in the course of the offense.

(e) Sentences.--Notwithstanding the provisions of section 1103 (relating to sentence of imprisonment for felony), a person convicted of an offense under:

Subsection (c) shall be sentenced to a term of imprisonment which shall be fixed by the court at not more than 40 years.

Subsection (d) shall be sentenced up to a maximum term of life imprisonment.

Sexual Assault: 18 Pa.C.S.A. § 3124.1
Except as provided in section 3121 (relating to rape) or 3123 (relating to involuntary deviate sexual intercourse), a person commits a felony of the second degree when that person engages in sexual intercourse or deviate sexual intercourse with a complainant without the complainant’s consent.

Domestic Violence: 23 Pa.C.S.A. § 6102
General rule.--The following words and phrases when used in this chapter shall have the meanings given to them in this section unless the context clearly indicates otherwise:

  • “Abuse.” The occurrence of one or more of the following acts between family or household members, sexual or intimate partners or persons who share biological parenthood:
  1. Attempting to cause or intentionally, knowingly or recklessly causing bodily injury, serious bodily injury, rape, involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, sexual assault, statutory sexual assault, aggravated indecent assault, indecent assault or incest with or without a deadly weapon.
  2. Placing another in reasonable fear of imminent serious bodily injury.
  3. The infliction of false imprisonment pursuant to 18 Pa.C.S. § 2903 (relating to false imprisonment).
  4. Physically or sexually abusing minor children, including such terms as defined in Chapter 63 (relating to child protective services).
  5. Knowingly engaging in a course of conduct or repeatedly committing acts toward another person, including following the person, without proper authority, under circumstances which place the person in reasonable fear of bodily injury. The definition of this paragraph applies only to proceedings commenced under this title and is inapplicable to any criminal prosecutions commenced under Title 18 (relating to crimes and offenses).
  • “Adult.” An individual who is 18 years of age or older.
  • “Certified copy.” A paper copy of the original order of the issuing court endorsed by the appropriate clerk of that court or an electronic copy of the original order of the issuing court endorsed with a digital signature of the judge or appropriate clerk of that court. A raised seal on the copy of the order of the issuing court shall not be required.
  • “Comparable court.” A foreign court that:
  1. has subject matter jurisdiction and is authorized to issue ex parte, emergency, temporary or final protection orders in that jurisdiction; and
  2. possessed jurisdiction over the parties when the protection order was issued in that jurisdiction.
  • “Confidential communications.” All information, whether written or spoken, transmitted between a victim and a domestic violence counselor or advocate in the course of the relationship. The term includes information received or given by the domestic violence counselor or advocate in the course of the relationship, as well as advice, reports, statistical data, memoranda or working papers, records or the like, given or made in the course of the relationship. The term also includes communications made by or to a linguistic interpreter assisting the victim, counselor or advocate in the course of the relationship.
  • “Domestic violence counselor/advocate.” An individual who is engaged in a domestic violence program, the primary purpose of which is the rendering of counseling or assistance to victims of domestic violence, who has undergone 40 hours of training.
  • “Domestic violence program.” A nonprofit organization or program whose primary purpose is to provide services to domestic violence victims which include, but are not limited to, crisis hotline; safe homes or shelters; community education; counseling systems intervention and interface; transportation, information and referral; and victim assistance.
  • “Family or household members.” Spouses or persons who have been spouses, persons living as spouses or who lived as spouses, parents and children, other persons related by consanguinity or affinity, current or former sexual or intimate partners or persons who share biological parenthood.
  • “Firearm.” Any weapon which is designed to or may readily be converted to expel any projectile by the action of an explosive or the frame or receiver of any such weapon as defined by 18 Pa.C.S. § 6105(i) (relating to persons not to possess, use, manufacture, control, sell or transfer firearms).
  • “Foreign protection order.” A protection order as defined by 18 U.S.C. § 2266 (relating to definitions) issued by a comparable court of another state, the District of Columbia, Indian tribe or territory, possession or commonwealth of the United States.
  • “Hearing officer.” A magisterial district judge, judge of the Philadelphia Municipal Court, arraignment court magistrate appointed under 42 Pa.C.S. § 1123 (relating to jurisdiction and venue), master appointed under 42 Pa.C.S. § 1126 (relating to masters) and master for emergency relief.
  • “Master for emergency relief.” A member of the bar of the Commonwealth appointed under section 6110(e) (relating to emergency relief by minor judiciary).
  • “Minor.” An individual who is not an adult.
  • “Other weapon.” Anything readily capable of lethal use and possessed under circumstances not manifestly appropriate for lawful uses which it may have. The term does not include a firearm.
  • “Safekeeping permit.” A permit issued by a sheriff allowing a person to take possession of any firearm, other weapon or ammunition that a judge ordered a defendant to relinquish in a protection from abuse proceeding.
  • “Secure visitation facility.” A court-approved visitation program offered in a facility with trained professional staff operated in a manner that safeguards children and parents from abuse and abduction.
  • “Sheriff.”
  1. Except as provided in paragraph (2), the sheriff of the county.
  2. In a city of the first class, the chief or head of the police department.
  • “Victim.” A person who is physically or sexually abused by a family or household member. For purposes of section 6116 (relating to confidentiality), a victim is a person against whom abuse is committed who consults a domestic violence counselor or advocate for the purpose of securing advice, counseling or assistance. The term shall also include persons who have a significant relationship with the victim and who seek advice, counseling or assistance from a domestic violence counselor or advocate regarding abuse of the victim.
  • “Weapon.” Anything readily capable of lethal use and possessed under circumstances not manifestly appropriate for lawful uses which it may have. The term includes a firearm which is not loaded or lacks a magazine, clip or other components to render it immediately operable and components which can readily be assembled into a weapon as defined by 18 Pa.C.S. § 907(relating to possessing instruments of crime).

Other terms. Terms not otherwise defined in this chapter shall have the meaning given to them in 18 Pa.C.S. (relating to crimes and offenses).

Stalking: 18 Pa.C.S. §2709.1

  • Offense defined.--A person commits the crime of stalking when the person either:
  1. engages in a course of conduct or repeatedly commits acts toward another person, including following the person without proper authority, under circumstances which demonstrate either an intent to place such other person in reasonable fear of bodily injury or to cause substantial emotional distress to such other person; or
  2. engages in a course of conduct or repeatedly communicates to another person under circumstances which demonstrate or communicate either an intent to place such other person in reasonable fear of bodily injury or to cause substantial emotional distress to such other person.

Consent in reference to sexual activity:

(a) General rule.--The consent of the victim to conduct charged to constitute an offense or to the result thereof is a defense if such consent negatives an element of the offense or precludes the infliction of the harm or evil sought to be prevented by the law defining the offense.
(b) Consent to bodily injury.--When conduct is charged to constitute an offense because it causes or threatens bodily injury, consent to such conduct or to the infliction of such injury is a defense if:

  • the conduct and the injury are reasonably foreseeable hazards of joint participation in a lawful athletic contest or competitive sport; or
  • the consent establishes a justification for the conduct under Chapter 5 of this title (relating to general principles of justification).

(c) Ineffective consent.--Unless otherwise provided by this title or by the law defining the offense, assent does not constitute consent if:

  • it is given by a person who is legally incapacitated to authorize the conduct charged to constitute the offense;
  • it is given by a person who by reason of youth, mental disease or defect or intoxication is manifestly unable or known by the actor to be unable to make a reasonable judgment as to the nature or harmfulness of the conduct charged to constitute the offense;
  • it is given by a person whose improvident consent is sought to be prevented by the law defining the offense; or
  • it is induced by force, duress or deception of a kind sought to be prevented by the law defining the offense.

Key Definitions Under the Clery Act

  1. Rape: The carnal knowledge of a person, forcibly and/or against the person’s will; or not forcibly or against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity (or because of his or her youth). For Clery reporting purposes, the crime of rape also includes sexual assault (intercourse without consent), sexual assault with an object, and forcible sodomy.
  2. Forcible Fondling: The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, forcibly and/or against that person’s will; or not forcibly or against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her youth or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental incapacity.
  3. Incest: Non-forcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.
  4. Statutory Rape: Non-forcible sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.
  5. Domestic Violence: Felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed by a current or former spouse of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person living with or has loved with the victim as a spouse, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim, or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family laws of the jurisdiction.
  6. Dating Violence: Violence by a person who has been in a romantic or intimate relationship with the victim.
  7. Stalking: To engage in a course of conduct or repeatedly commits acts toward another person, including following the person without proper authority, under circumstances which demonstrate either an intent to place such other person in reasonable fear of bodily injury or to cause substantial emotional distress to such other person, or repeatedly communicates to another person under circumstances which demonstrate or communicate either an intent to place such other person in reasonable fear of bodily injury or to cause substantial emotional distress to such other person.
Content

If you have been a victim of sexual assault, relationship violence or and/or stalking, talk to somebody about what happened so that you can get the support you need, and so the university can respond appropriately. While every attempt will be made to respect your privacy, you should know that different employees on campus have different abilities to maintain a victim’s confidentiality.

  • Some are required to maintain near complete confidentiality; talking to them is sometimes called a “privileged communication.”
  • Other employees may talk to a victim in confidence, and generally only report to the University that an incident occurred without revealing any personally identifying information. Disclosures to these employees will not trigger a University investigation into an incident against the victim’s wishes.
  • Thirdly, some employees are required to report all the details of an incident (including the identities of both the victim and alleged perpetrator) to the Title IX Liaison. A report to these employees (called “responsible employees”) constitutes a report to the University – and generally obligates Pitt-Bradford to investigate the incident and take appropriate steps to address the situation.

This policy is intended to make students aware of the various reporting and confidential disclosure options available to them – so they can make informed choices about where to turn should they become a victim of sexual violence.

Pitt-Bradford strongly encourages victims to talk to someone identified in one or more of these groups. Regardless of whether you would like to move forward with a formal complaint or report, Pitt-Bradford will provide you with information and support. Know that you never need to feel alone at Pitt-Bradford. Reach out and get help.

Reporting Options:

  • Reporting to “Privileged and Confidential” Employees 
  • Reporting to “Responsible Employees
  • Anonymous Reporting
  • Off-campus Counselors and Advocates
Content

If a victim discloses an incident to a responsible employee but wishes to maintain confidentiality or requests that no investigation into a particular incident be conducted or disciplinary action taken, the University must weigh that request against the University’s obligation to provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for all students, including the victim.

If the University honors the request for confidentiality, a victim must understand that the University’s ability to meaningfully investigate the incident and pursue disciplinary action against the alleged perpetrator(s) may be limited. Although rare, there are times when the University may not be able to honor a victim’s request in order to provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for all students. The University of Pittsburgh has designated the following individual to evaluate requests for confidentiality once a responsible employee is on notice of alleged sexual violence:

University of Pittsburgh Title IX Coordinator: 412-648-7861 or titleIXcoordinator@pitt.edu.

When weighing a victim’s request for confidentiality or that no investigation or discipline be pursued, a range of factors will be considered, including the increased risk that the alleged perpetrator will commit additional acts of sexual or other violence, such as whether:

  • there have been other sexual violence complaints about the same alleged perpetrator
  • the alleged perpetrator has a history of arrests or records from a prior school indicating a history of violence;the alleged perpetrator threatened further sexual violence or other violence against the victim or others
  • the sexual violence was committed by multiple perpetrators; whether the sexual violence was perpetrated with a weapon
  • the victim is a minor
  • the University possesses other means to obtain relevant evidence of the sexual violence (e.g., security cameras or personnel, physical evidence)
  • the victim’s report reveals a pattern of perpetration (e.g., via illicit use of drugs or alcohol) at a given location or by a particular group

The presence of one or more of these factors could lead the University to investigate and, if appropriate, pursue disciplinary action. If none of these factors is present, the University will likely respect the victim’s request for confidentiality.

If the University determines that it cannot maintain a victim’s confidentiality, the University will inform the victim prior to starting an investigation and will, to the extent possible, only share information with people responsible for handling the University’s response.

The University will remain ever mindful of the victim’s well-being, and will take ongoing steps to protect the victim from retaliation or harm and work with the victim to create a safety plan. Retaliation against the victim, whether by students or University employees, is strictly prohibited by University policy and will not be tolerated. The University will also:

  • assist the victim in accessing other available victim advocacy, academic support, counseling, disability, health or mental health services, and legal assistance both on and off campus;
  • provide other security and support, which could include issuing a no-contact order, helping arrange a change of living or working arrangements or course schedules (including for the alleged perpetrator pending the outcome of an investigation) or adjustments for assignments or tests; and
  •  inform the victim of the right to report a crime to campus or local law enforcement – and provide the victim with assistance if the victim wishes to do so.

The University may not require a victim to participate in any investigation or disciplinary proceeding. Because the University is under a continuing obligation to address the issue of sexual violence campus-wide, reports of sexual violence (including non-identifying reports) will also prompt the University to consider broader remedial action – such as increased monitoring, supervision or security at locations where the reported sexual violence occurred; increasing education and prevention efforts, including to targeted population groups; conducting climate assessments/victimization surveys; and/or revisiting its policies and practices.

If the University determines that it can respect a victim’s request for confidentiality, the University will also take immediate action as necessary to protect and assist the victim.

NOTE: If the University determines that the alleged perpetrator(s) pose a serious and immediate threat to the campus community, a timely warning may be issued to the community by a member of the Campus Security Authority. However, that warning will not include information that identifies the victim.